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Eating Schedule : Before and After Workouts

personal trainer Dedicating yourself to a healthy lifestyle by eating the right diet and living a more actively seems simple. But it entails a lot of discipline and a little know how. This is true especially for those who are planning to spend a couple of hours at the gym.

The body needs a steady source of energy and nutrients. This holds true for those planning to lose weight or adding muscles. Energy is needed to power your various workout exercises and getting enough energy is essential to proper functioning in the gym. What happens after workouts is also essential. It determines the most safest and opportune time to eat and help your body in the recovery process.

Before Workouts

If you're planning to go on a workout it is important for you to adjust eating times accordingly. Working out with a full stomach could have a negative effect on your workout. The body spends energy digesting, energy which is needed during a workout. This only makes you tire easily as your body divides itself between digesting and providing you with energy during workouts.

Working out in the gym entails focus both mentally and physically. And a full stomach could make you feel lethargic or overly relaxed. Lifting weights especially free weights can be taxing mentally and needs full focus. Hard to do when your body is still busy digesting a meal.

Eating after Workouts

Your body's natural reaction after a workout is to replace lost energy stores. Strenuous workouts may have caused minor muscle tear which require immediate repair. Feelings of hunger is triggered, signaling you that your body is in need of instant nourishment.

If you're about to go through a long workout, one or two hours for example. Be sure to have something handy to provide you with a quick energy source. Eat snacks rich in protein and carbohydrates. Bring snacks in the gym to immediately replenish energy and jumpstart the repairing process. Water is also essential. This is needed to prevent dehydration after a grueling workout.

A 15 minute minimum is required after exercising before you eat.

For those not hungry

For some especially for those whose goal is losing weight, eating after your workout could be detrimental to your weight loss efforts. Eating after a workout actually helps the body restock lost fats which might have been lost during the workout. If you feel hungry, only consume that which is enough to keep you going through the day.

Drink water, pure fruit juices or an energy drink to prevent dehydration and replace lost electrolytes. Even when you're not feeling hungry or trying to lose weight, replacing lost electrolytes is essential for maintaining proper energy levels.

Eating habits before and after workouts

Working out in the gym is one of the best and fastest way to a healthier body. But it entails an extra sense of discipline. This includes proper eating habits to maximize every second you spend in the gym. So the next time you plan on going to the gym, take note of this simple guide on eating before and after workouts.

Fitness for All: Best Workouts for Short Amounts of Time

As things around the world are “starting” to get back to normal after the past 18 months, people find themselves back in the hustle and bustle of their “pre-pandemic” life.

Work, social lives, activities, school, sports and so much more occupy a huge chunk of our days and leave very little time for exercise. But there are still great exercises that you can fit into any busy schedule. Experts suggest that if you don’t have time to do a full circuit exercise routine, then just stick to one or more of these three great body movers – around the world lunges, squats, and planks.

Here’s how to do the above for maximum benefits.

Around the World Lunges - Start standing with feet shoulder-width apart. Take a large step forward with your left foot. Bend both knees to about 90 degrees, making sure that your weight is evenly distributed between both legs. Your front knee should be directly over your ankle (and not extended past it). That is your front lunge. Step your left foot back to center. Step the left foot out to the left side and bend the left knee (kneecap facing forward).

Keep the right leg extended straight. That’s your side lunge. Step your left foot back to center. Next step your left foot behind you so now your right leg is in front. That’s your rear lunge. Return left leg to starting position. Now repeat the sequence in the opposite direction using the right leg.

Squats - Start standing with feet about hip-distance apart. Engage your core muscles as you begin pressing your hips back as if you’re about to sit in a chair (increasingly shifting pressure onto your heels and keeping them flat on the floor), lowering as far as you are able. Focus on keeping your shoulders pulled back and your back straight. Keep knees in line with toes. Press into your feet and straighten to come back up. (You should feel the glute and other leg muscles engage.)

Planks - Start in the top of a push-up position, making sure your shoulders are above your wrists. Engage your leg muscles, pushing back through your heels, while also engaging your core muscles. Hold the position, making sure your shoulders don’t collapse inward and your back doesn’t sag down. You want to be in as much of a straight line as possible.

Fitness for All: Take a Walk… or a Hike

In 2018, more than 111 million people chose walking as their aerobic activity of choice and in 2020, hiking enticed 57.8 million Americans to hit the trail, a number that dramatically increased since 2014.

 

Both activities are low-risk ways to get your exercise in (especially during a pandemic) and keep you moving!

But is walking better than hiking? Or is hiking better than walking? Here a couple things to keep in mind when choosing to lace up your sneakers or hiking boots.

Walking is typically done outside in an urban or suburban flat area (or indoors on a treadmill or at a mall), while hiking is done in the outdoors along natural terrain, with elevation changes.

Both walking and hiking can help you to manage cholesterol and blood pressure. They are both great for improving heart and lung performance, and they both can help you lose weight.

If you want to burn more calories, hiking is your better option. While you can burn approximately 100 calories per mile walking, you can burn approximately 500 calories per mile hiking while wearing a heavy backpack going over arduous terrain.

If you are looking for an inexpensive workout, then walking wins this one. You can walk for free anywhere; while you might have to drive further distances to hike and wear hiking boots and use other hiking gear for peak performance.

Whether you choose to take a hike or take a walk, both activities are great ways to get your exercise, clear your mind and take a breath of fresh air!

Fitness for All: Winter Fitness- Safety for Exercising Outdoors

The cold months are upon us and once again we take to the outdoors to get some winter exercise in. Try these tips for exercising during the cold months to stay motivated, fit, and warm.

Stay safe during winter exercise. Be sure to check with your doctor before starting any outdoor exercise routines, as many people with certain conditions – like asthma and heart problems – may have some conflicts with their medications and the colder weather.

Check the weather conditions and wind chill. Temperature, wind, and moisture, along with the length of time that you’ll be outside, are key factors in planning a safe cold-weather workout. The wind can penetrate your clothes and remove the insulating layer of warm air that surrounds your body. Any exposed skin is vulnerable to frostbite.

Know the signs of frostbite and hypothermia. Frostbite is most common on exposed skin, such as your cheeks, nose, and ears. It can also occur on hands and feet. Early warning signs include numbness, loss of feeling or a stinging sensation. Hypothermia is abnormally low body temperature. When exposed to cold temperatures, your body begins to lose heat faster than it can be produced. Exercising in cold, rainy weather increases the risk of hypothermia. Older adults and young children are at greater risk.

Dress in layers. Dress in layers that you can remove as soon as you start to sweat and then put back on as needed. First, put on a thin layer of synthetic material, such as polypropylene, which draws sweat away from your body. Avoid cotton, which stays wet next to your skin. Next add a layer of fleece or wool for insulation. Top this with a waterproof, breathable outer layer.