Enjoy a full years subscription of Healthy Revelations and discover life-changing health secrets you won't find anywhere else.

  • $240 Yearly Value
Topics covered include:
  • How To Lose Weight Fast
  • Healthy Eating
  • Stress Relief
  • Disease Prevention
  • Doctor Recommendations
  • Seasonal Health Tips
  • And More...

Clean Eating 101: Ways to Detox Your Food

Written by Lisa Jillanza

Nearly every day we hear about our foods and how they are becoming laced with synthetic ingredients.  If you want to avoid these synthetic ingredients, you need to learn how to detoxify the foods you are eating and choose healthier foods.

Here are some suggestions to detoxify and eat healthier this year:

  • Clean your Produce.
  • Avoid cans as much as possible.
  • Choose Whole Foods.
  • Shop for Safer Seafood.
  • Watch your Animal Fat Intake.

In the News Celebrating World Vegan Month– Part II

Written by Lisa Jillanza

(continued from Part I…)

 

Label reading and label awareness is especially important for those who follow a vegan diet. This is also very important to those who have animal-specific allergies. The Vegan Society suggests that everyone read labels and re-read labels, as over time ingredients of even your favorite foods may change. 

There is a difference between vegan products and “free-from” products, so being food conscious is extremely important for those who follow a vegan lifestyle. 

So, what do vegans eat? (Besides the obvious vegetables!) 

Essentially, vegans eat everything and anything that comes from plants: fruits, vegetables, nuts, beans, grains, seeds, and pulses. 

What about eating out as a vegan? 

Any chef worth their salt will be able to rustle up something vegan for you from ingredients they already have in the kitchen - and if you ask nicely, many will rise to the challenge of creating tasty vegan mains and decadent desserts. Contact them in advance so they’re not put on the spot. Be prepared to help them out with suggestions of easy vegan meals – some chefs need a little nudge to realize just how many of the delicious ingredients they use happen to be vegan anyway. 

Another thing that vegans need to do is find dairy replacements. Most stores these days offer “dairy-free” and vegan cheese, milk, yogurt, sour cream, ice cream and other foods that are safe to consume and in fact, tasty as their non-vegan counterparts.

In the News Celebrating World Vegan Month– Part I

Written by Lisa Jillanza

Back in November 1944, founding members of The Vegan Society first coined the term “vegan” and for the past 80 years every November they celebrate World Vegan Month.

So this month we take a look into the culture of Veganism and talk about some of the ins and outs of this movement that has gained popularity over the past 80 years.

What is Veganism?

According to the Vegan Society, it is defined as “Veganism is a philosophy and way of living which seeks to exclude - as far as is possible and practicable - all forms of exploitation of, and cruelty to, animals for food, clothing, or any other purpose; and by extension, promotes the development and use of animal-free alternatives for the benefit of animals, humans and the environment. In dietary terms it denotes the practice of dispensing with all products derived wholly or partly from animals.”

Those at the Vegan Society stress that veganism is not just about diet, but also a way of life. For example, vegans will not wear leather or suede and they will not use beauty products whose ingredients are derived from animals. 

When people follow a vegan diet, they often eat more fruits and vegetables and enjoy meals that contain more fiber and are lower in saturated fats. 

A vegan diet thrives off the following nutrients:

  • Vitamin B 12
  • Protein
  • Omega 3 Fats
  • Calcium
  • Vitamin B
  • Iodine
  • Selenium
  • Iron
  • Zinc
  • Vitamins K and A

 

(continued in Part II…)

Eating Healthy Spotlight on: Mangoes

Written by Lisa Jillanza
  • Mangoes are an excellent source of vitamins A and C, and they are also an excellent way to replenish potassium lost through exercise or for those who are constantly “on the go.”
  • An average-sized mango can even contain up to 40 percent of your daily fiber requirement, thereby being a great way to curb constipation and irregularity.
  • Mangoes can also help to prevent certain types of cancer and help to lower blood cholesterol levels, too.

Recipe: Jamaican Jerk Chicken Salad 

  • ½ cup prepared or purchased honey mustard dressing
  • 1 teaspoon finely grated lime zest
  • 4 chicken breast halves without skin, boneless
  • 1 tablespoon Jamaican Jerk seasoning
  • 2 large fresh mangoes
  • 10 to 12 cups mixed greens 

Stir together honey mustard dressing and lime zest.  Cover and chill dressing while preparing chicken. 

Rinse chicken and pat dry; sprinkle with Jerk seasoning.  In a large skillet cook the seasoned chicken in hot oil over medium-high heat about 6 minutes on each side until browned and no longer pink.  Thinly slice each chicken breast. 

Arrange warm chicken and mango atop greens on four plates; drizzle with the honey mustard dressing.

 

Recipe:  Mango Pork 

  • 2 medium ripe mangoes
  • 1 pork tenderloin, about ¾ pound
  • Cooking spray or olive oil
  • Salt and pepper to taste
  • Hot pepper sauce 

Put pulp of one mango in food processor or blender.

Cut the other mango into small cubes.  Trim pork tenderloin and slice into 1-inch thick medallions.  Flatten slices lightly with hand.  Spray a skillet or medium saucepan with cooking spray or add a small amount of olive oil and heat on medium-high.  Brown pork for one minute on each side. Season each side with salt and pepper to taste. 

Reduce heat and cook pork another five minutes to cook through.  Remove to plate and add mango to skillet or saucepan. Cook puree about, scraping up brown bits of pork, for about 30 seconds.  Add several drops of hot sauce and the mango cubes.  Toss cubes in puree while heating through.  Spoon sauce over pork and serve with pasta or hot cooked rice.

Health 101: Ways To Tell If You Are Not Getting Enough Protein

Written by Lisa Jillanza

Our bodies have a unique way of telling us when we are not getting enough protein in our diet. Here are seven great ways that show us we are lacking protein:

  • You are constantly weak and hungry.
  • Your muscles no longer have definition.
  • You are struggling to lose weight.
  • You are losing your hair.
  • You are always getting sick.
  • Your lower legs and feet swell unexpectedly.
  • Your skin gets patchy in places.