Enjoy a full years subscription of Healthy Revelations and discover life-changing health secrets you won't find anywhere else.

  • $240 Yearly Value
Topics covered include:
  • How To Lose Weight Fast
  • Healthy Eating
  • Stress Relief
  • Disease Prevention
  • Doctor Recommendations
  • Seasonal Health Tips
  • And More...

Avoid the Sting This Summer: Dealing With Insect Bites and Stings

Written by Lisa Jillanza

Just like we have been cooped up all winter, so have been a number of those creatures that we've come to despise: insects.

With summer in full bloom, insects are also in full swing and are ready to attack when necessary. So, what do you do to avoid these nasty creatures biting you? Environmentalists suggest that the best way to deal with insect bites and stings is to prevent them before they happen.

Preventing bug bites includes:

Applying repellents to exposed skin. Do not apply repellents directly to your face, instead spray the repellent into your hands and apply to your face that way.

Wearing shoes when walking around outdoors. Avoid going barefoot whenever possible.

Do not swat or attempt to hit a flying insect. This will only make them mad and attack you more frequently.

Covering food when it is outdoors. Insects flock to food and the less chance you give them to get to the food, the greater your chance of avoiding them all together is.

Avoiding bright colored clothes when you are outdoors for extended periods of time as insects are attracted to bright colors.

Trying not to wear heavy smelling perfumes outdoors as insects are also attracted to the smells.

Keep these tips in mind before you head outdoors and you won't be dealing with insects biting or stinging you this summer.

With Spring Comes Hay Fever: What Plants to Avoid

Written by Lisa Jillanza

Spring is finally here! After a long and cold winter, everyone is in their glory with the sunshine and warm weather.

However, coming hand-in-hand with the blooming season is some people's dreaded seasonal nightmare: hay fever.

One of the best plans of action for fighting spring allergies is to avoid the things that make your sneezing, itching and watering eyes worse. Warren V. Filley, M.D., a spokesperson for the American Academy of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology, recently told health.com which plants you should avoid.

Ragweed : It is common along riverbanks and in rural areas. Dr. Filley says that almost 75 percent of people with allergies are sensitive to ragweed.

Mountain cedar : This tree is commonly found in mountainous regions and, according to Dr. Filley, causes some of the “most severe allergy symptoms I have ever seen.”

Ryegrass : This grass is common in dry lawns, meadows and pastures. This, along with other grasses, is often very problematic for allergy sufferers, Dr. Filley says.

Maple : These trees are found along streams and in woods all through the eastern United States and Canada. The maple produces potent allergens.

Elm : Common in the wetlands, these trees will most likely aggravate your allergies.

Mulberry : This pretty tree can be very deceiving. Found in woods and river valleys, it is often associated with contributing to hay fever.

Pecan : Although it makes many good desserts, the pollen from pecan : found in woods and orchards : is second only to ragweed as the most severe source of allergens.

Oak : It may have less potent pollen, but it produces very large quantities of it, Dr. Filley says. Avoid the woods just for this one.

Pigweed/Tumbleweed : This common weed is found in lawns and along roadsides, but be aware that it will not do your sinuses any good.

Arizona cypress : Found specifically in warm climates and well-drained soil areas, this tree can contribute to pollen problems almost all year round, according to the article.

Mold : Allergies acting up in the spring could be because of mold levels rising with wetter, warmer air. Dr. Filley contributes various types of molds to producing significant allergy symptoms throughout the United States.

While this only touches on a few possible plants and their related allergens, every day researchers are finding more and more possible allergens that people are dealing with in their lives.

Keep in mind that medication will help most symptoms of allergies, but it's best to see an allergist to determine the exact allergy that you are dealing with and treat that particular allergen, rather than taking a general “allergy pill” that encompasses many different symptoms and allergens.

Straight From the Headlines: Ease Back Into Spring

Written by Lisa Jillanza

As the ice and snow start to melt and the mercury starts to rise again, everyone starts to think about getting back in shape for the spring and summer seasons. Instead of hitting the exercise hard, many experts suggest easing back into your springtime routine. According to www.prevention.com, here are some tips to get you started.

Start Slow- Take the time you need to jump start your spring diet and exercise plan. By easing into your regimen you will be more successful in keeping with your diet and exercise plan.

Plan a New Menu- You need to really look at your diet and the amount of calories you are consuming on a daily basis. Choose foods that are low in calories but are filling to help you fight off the hunger throughout the day.

Get outdoors- Now that the weather is breaking, mix up your exercise routine and enjoy the weather outdoors. Walk, hike, bike, run , enjoy yourself and the beautiful season.

Leap Into Leap Year!

Written by Lisa Jillanza

Every four years we get to celebrate leap year, so why not leap into 2012 with 29 fun fitness and food tips to stay healthy all year long!

1. Make breakfast happen every day to keep your energy levels up and motivated throughout the morning!

2. Start off your morning with an 8 oz. glass of water before you have your coffee.

3. Snack on raisins to combat drowsiness.

4. Walking sideways burns 78% more calories than walking forward.

5. To increase body toning, cardiovascular fitness and burn more calories, walk uphill.

6. Blend equal portions of nonfat yogurt and your favorite salsa for a fat-free, low-calorie dressing for chicken, fish or salads.

7. One of the best ways to protect yourself during the cold and flu season is to wash your hands thoroughly and regularly.

8. Walking on a rough but level track requires 50 percent more energy than walking on a paved road.

9. Your shoes should be replaced every 500 miles.

10. A weight gain of 11-18 pounds increases your risk of heart disease by 25 percent. More than 25 pounds and your risk goes up by 200 to 300 percent!

11. High protein/low carbohydrate diets don't work in the long run. Instead follow a balanced food plan which includes foods from all of the food groups.

12. Park your car as far away from the entrance as possible so you can get in some extra fitness while running your daily errands.

13. Pack a lunch for work if you can't find a restaurant that offers whole grains, fruits and vegetables.

14. Get off the bus a few stops early and walk the rest of the way to your destination.

15. Use physical activity as a reward instead of food. For example, everyone goes ice skating for a good report card instead of out for pizza.

16. Join the local YMCA or health club.

17. Build an obstacle course in your basement or garage on a rainy day!

18. Dig and plant vegetables in a garden. Get your whole family in on the fun.

19. Take a nature hike.

20. Go to a driving range or enjoy a game of miniature golf.

21. Go camping where you can pitch a tent, fish, cut and stack firewood and hike.

22. Visit farms throughout the year where you can pick your own berries, apples and peaches.

23. Take a long walk or a jog on the beach.

24. Have fun in the snow, build a snowman, a snow fort, or make snow angels.

25. Rake up the leaves and then jump in them!!

26. Use a map and map out a course in your area.

27. Take everyone to the grocery store to pick out healthy meals and learn to read nutrition labels.

28. Enter to walk or run individually and in teams in local charity events.

29. Adopt a highway and keep it clean!

Ring in a Healthy New Year!

Written by Lisa Jillanza

Once again we are about to welcome in a New Year. If your New Year's Resolution is to maintain your health and eat better in 2012, then these foods (and drinks) should be high on your grocery list!

Grains: Dieticians suggest that you increase your intake of oats, barley and rye in 2012. For years, doctors have been telling patients that eating oats can bring down your cholesterol and recent studies show that rye can, too. The American Diabetes Association has also noted that eating a diet high in fiber and grains, like rye, can help prevent the development of type 2 diabetes. Adding barley to your diet, whether it is as a side dish or inside a soup or casserole, can also lower your cholesterol and reduce the risk of type 2 diabetes and cardiovascular disease.

Salmon and other oily fish: If the diagnosis is to get more vitamin D this year, then get your fill with salmon and other oily fish : such as, mackerel, sardines, herring, fresh tuna, trout and anchovies. Oily fish are some of the only food sources of vitamin D. These fish are also good for curbing cardiovascular disease. The American Heart Association recommends eating two servings of oily fish per week, but warns against eating too much more than that because some oily fish contain mercury, which can affect your brain and nervous system.

Soy: If 2012 is your year to help reduce your risk of cancer, then soy may be your answer. Research has shown that soy can ward off certain cancers as well as have an impact on your heart. The Food and Drug Administration states that 25 grams of soy protein a day can reduce heart problems by helping to lower cholesterol levels. To add soy to your diet, you can find it in soy burgers, tofu and soy milk.

Red Wine: While you will rarely hear any doctor advising that you drink any alcohol, red wine may just be the exception. Research shows that antioxidants in red wine, polyphenols, aid in protecting the lining of blood vessels in the heart. These antioxidants come in the form of flavonoids and nonflavonoids, which red wine has more than any other food or drink. Experts advise that you should stick to red over white wine because red grapes have 10 times more benefit to your health than white grapes. But, as with any alcohol, red wine should be enjoyed in moderation : approximately 5 ounces a day for women and 10 ounces a day for men.