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In the News World Alzheimer’s Awareness Month – Part I

Written by Lisa Jillanza

Every September, Alzheimer’s Awareness is celebrated worldwide, and World Alzheimer’s Day takes place every year on September 21.

Understanding Alzheimer’s is important because Alzheimer’s disease is the “most common form of dementia, affecting about 6 percent of people 65 and older.”

In this two-part article, we will talk about this disease in depth and give you some ways to get involved in this important awareness event.

First some facts and figures associated with Alzheimer’s Disease. Dementia is an umbrella term for a collection of symptoms that are caused by disorders affecting the brain and impacting memory, thinking, behavior and emotion, like Alzheimer’s. Symptoms include loss of memory, difficulty in finding the right words or understanding what people are saying, difficulty in performing previously routine tasks, and personality and mood changes.

Important facts about Alzheimer’s are:

  1. It's a killer

About one in three seniors dies with Alzheimer's or another type of dementia — more than breast cancer and prostate cancer combined.​

  1. ​Deaths are increasing

​Since 2000, deaths from Alzheimer's disease have increased by more than 120 percent.

  1. Alzheimer's will affect more and more Americans

​If current projections are accurate, by the year 2050, the number of Americans suffering from Alzheimer's disease will reach nearly 14 million.

  1. ​Women are most likely to be affected

​Statistics show that about two-thirds of Americans with Alzheimer's disease are women.

  1. ​Hispanics are more susceptible

Statistics also show that ​Hispanics are about one-and-a-half times as likely to have Alzheimer's disease (or other dementias) as older, white, non-Hispanics.

 

(Continued in part II…)