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Straight From the Headlines: Choosing the Best Oil For Your Colon Health

Written by Lisa Jillanza

In a recent animal study, it was found that diets that included canola oil rather than corn oil had less of a chance of growing colon tumors.

One of the reasons that give canola the edge is the high amount of omega-3 fatty acids, where corn oil is higher in omega-6 fatty acids. In the animals tested, researchers charted the size and number of colon tumors and tested their blood for its fatty acid amount. When comparing animals whose diets contained corn oil verses canola oil, the animals whose diet included canola oil had fewer tumors and much smaller tumors on average.

While researchers will next attempt this same study on humans, researchers and nutritionists alike agree that only good can come from including more omega-3 fatty acids in your diet.

Prepare Yourself for Cold and Flu Season: Do's and Don'ts

Written by Lisa Jillanza

Now that the kids are back in school and the weather is starting to change, it's time to start worrying about the cold and flu season. But this year your worrying can be less if you take the following dos and don'ts into consideration and protect your family and yourself.

Do use hand sanitizer- Carry a pocket-sized hand sanitizer with you at all times and use it generously whenever you are in public places. Germs are everywhere and on everything and by using hand sanitizer you are protecting yourself from bringing home these flu viruses.

Do wash your hands frequently- It may seem like the simplest thing to do, but be sure that you are washing your hands frequently with warm water and soap, and for at least 15 to 20 seconds. Teachers are now telling students to sing the ABC's or Happy Birthday to themselves while they are washing their hands to be sure you are washing for a full 15 to 20 seconds.

Do sneeze into the crook of your elbow- By sneezing into your elbow, you are avoiding transmitting flu viruses to your hands and will keep you from passing the virus to others. It may seem socially awkward at first, but soon you will see more and more people doing this when they sneeze.

Don't shake hands- To keep from transmitting germs, avoid shaking hands with people when you greet them. Try a head nod, waving or smiling instead to greet someone. If you can't avoid shaking someone's hand, then be sure to use your hand sanitizer following the hand shake.

Don't use someone else's phone or computer mouse- Phones and computers harbor some pretty heinous germs for hours. Avoid sharing someone else's phone or computer mouse if at all possible. If you do have to use someone else's phone or computer wipe it down with an alcohol swab prior to using it.

Don't change a diaper without washing your hands immediately afterwards- This should be a given at all times and not just during the flu season, but stool harbors gastrointestinal bugs that cause diarrhea, vomiting and upset stomach. It may also contain H1N1, so anyone changing a diaper needs to be sure that they are washing their hands (for 15 to 20 seconds) following the changing.

Straight From the Headlines: Having Low Cholesterol Can Ward Off Prostate Cancer

Written by Lisa Jillanza

According to a recent report put out by www.msnbc.com, new studies show that many men may be able to lower their risk of acquiring the most aggressive form of prostate cancer if they keep their cholesterol levels in the healthy range.

The report states that “men whose cholesterol was under 200 had less than half the risk of developing high-grade prostate tumors compared to men with high cholesterol.”

While having high cholesterol is typically a consequence of aging, young people are not in the clear either. Luckily there are preventive measures that anyone can do to help lower their cholesterol levels.

There are four basic ways to help maintain a healthy cholesterol level: 1. Eat a healthy diet 2. Exercise 3. Lose weight 4. Take medicine : in some cases

Some people will need to implement only one of these, while others will require a combination of these tips to help regulate their cholesterol.

Research Shows: Help Prevent Alzheimer's Disease with Exercise

Written by Lisa Jillanza

According to Mayoclinic.com a recent report for the Alzheimer's Association predicts that 10 million baby boomers will develop Alzheimer's disease in the U.S. alone. This staggering number translates to about one out of every eight baby boomer.

While new treatments are constantly being studied and analyzed many believe that a cure will not be readily available during this lifetime. However, studies keep point to the fact that physical activity or exercise is one of the most effective ways to prevent the disease. Beyond a healthy heart and regulated body weight, studies suggest that exercise which raises your heart rate for at least 30 minutes several times a week can lower your risk for Alzheimer's. In fact, it looks as though exercise inhibits Alzheimer's-like brain changes in mice which decelerate the development of a major component of the disease.

Researchers have found that women age 65 and older who are physically active are less likely to experience a decline in mental function than inactive women. Another study was conducted by researchers at the University of Chicago in which mice, after having been bred to develop Alzheimer's type plaque in the brain were allowed to exercise while others were not. The brains in the physically active mice had 50 to 80 percent less plaque than the brains of the sedentary mice and the exercising mice produced significantly more of an enzyme in the brain that prevents plaque.

Another study completed at the University of Washington School of Medicine and Veterans Affairs Puget Sound Health Care System also tested the effects of aerobic training on 33 women and men diagnosed with mild cognitive impairment, which is often considered a precursor to Alzheimer's disease.

According to Oregonlive.com 23 of the volunteers, selected randomly, began an intense program of aerobic exercise, consisting of 45 to 60 minutes on a treadmill or stationary bike four days a week. The remaining 10, the study's control group, spent the same amount of time performing non-aerobic stretching and balance exercises.

After six months, the aerobic exercisers showed significant gains in mental agility, while the non-aerobic group showed continuing decline in tests of thinking speed, fluency with words and ability to multi-task.

Even though it still remains unknown whether exercise can prevent Alzheimer's, many scientists believe that lifestyle factors including exercise, mental stimulation and strong social connections are more likely to help in the prevention of Alzheimer's disease than any existing pharmaceuticals or supplements.