Enjoy a full years subscription of Healthy Revelations and discover life-changing health secrets you won't find anywhere else.

  • $240 Yearly Value
Topics covered include:
  • How To Lose Weight Fast
  • Healthy Eating
  • Stress Relief
  • Disease Prevention
  • Doctor Recommendations
  • Seasonal Health Tips
  • And More...

Health Benefits of Massage Therapy

For more than 120 years, experts have been researching the benefits of massage therapy, and besides the obvious stress-free feeling that people have following a massage, there are plenty of other benefits to this ancient healing procedure.

One major benefit of massage therapy that researchers have found is that people who get massages on a regular basis have noticed a decrease in their blood pressure.

Massages also help to alleviate the pain of those who suffer from migraine headaches.

Massage can also: reduce your heart rate, increase blood circulation and lymph flow, relax your muscles, improve your range of motion, and increase endorphins.

Research has also shown that while massage therapy does not increase your muscle strength, it can stimulate your weak and inactive muscles and can thereby aid muscles that you may not have worked out in quite some time.

Massage therapy can also speed up your recovery process if you do have an injury.

Some other physical benefits of massage therapy include: relieving muscle tension and stiffness, alleviating discomfort during pregnancy, reducing muscle spasms, promoting deeper and easier breathing, enhancing the health and nourishment of your skin, and improving your posture.

Massage therapy, while a physical act, is not all about physical benefits. There are plenty of mental benefits that having a massage can give you.

Some of these mental benefits include: promoting mental alertness, relieving mental stress, reducing levels of anxiety, improving motor skills, creating body awareness, and fostering a feeling of well being.

While this article only touches on a few benefits of massage therapy, both physical and mental, there are plenty more out there that researchers are learning about each and every day.

So, whatever your reason may be, pamper yourself today and reap all of the benefits of a great massage.

 

Heal Your Sunburn the Natural Way

Now that spring is in full bloom and summer is just around the corner, it's time again for some fun and sun. And while sunshine can be quite enjoyable, it can also wreak havoc on your skin and can potentially cause a pretty nasty sunburn.

Not only do sunburns hurt but they cause a great deal of damage to your skin that can be potentially long lasting and dangerous. According to Mothernature.com the redness of a sunburn is caused by clogged and swollen capillaries that supply blood to the skin. Severe sunburns are caused by ultraviolet rays in sunlight which can destroy elastic fibers in the skin causing sagging, wrinkling and can also lead to skin cancer.

Prevention is always best. In order to prevent sunburns, try heading outdoors before 10 a.m. or after 2 p.m. when the ultraviolet rays are less intense. And always wear sunscreen with an SPF of 15 or higher.

If it's too late and the damage has already been done, you may also want to try some of these ways to heal your sunburn naturally: Use Vitamin E- While there are plenty of sunburn remedies that you can buy over-the-counter, just look in your cabinet for any lotion that contains vitamin E and aloe vera. The vitamin E and aloe vera add nutrients back into the skin that the UV rays have left unbalanced. The aloe vera also gives the cooling effect that is much needed for that sunburn.

An Oatmeal Bath- Found on MSNBC.com take a lukewarm bath with 1 cup added ground oatmeal (grind it with a mortar and pestle; instant oatmeal works fine), 1 cup whole milk, 2 tablespoons honey, and 2 tablespoons aloe vera gel. Oatmeal is anti-inflammatory, honey is antiseptic, milk's proteins and fats soothe skin, and aloe numbs pain. Afterward, moisturize with a cream containing hydrating shea butter and aloe.

Soothing Foods- Check the kitchen cupboard and the refrigerator. Items like vinegar, mustard, yogurt, tomatoes and avocados all contain extra vitamin E and will help to relieve the burn just as any cream or lotion would.

Oils- Try Lavender Essential Oil. When used in conjunction with aloe vera, the oil helps to promote new skin growth and heals first degree burns.

Opt for Green Tea- Green tea is perfect for reducing the swelling of the skin associated with sunburns, as well as taking out the sting of the burn. To make the green tea compress, bring a pot of tea to boil then pour it over 1 teaspoon of loose green tea. Cover and let it sit for 5 minutes and then mix with an equal amount of cold water. Once the mixture is cooled, soak a clean cloth in it and put it on the sunburned skin for five to ten minutes. This can be applied several times a day.

Milk- Found on Mothernature.com the fat content of milk is soothing, so milk makes a great compress for sunburn pain, says John F. Romano, M.D. clinical assistant professor of dermatology at Cornell Medical Center in New York City. His instructions: Dip some gauze in whole milk and apply it to sunburned areas for about 20 minutes, repeating this process every two to four hours. Be sure to wash off the milk to avoid having your skin smell sour.

Baking Soda- A baking soda bath is great for soothing a sunburn. Add one cup of baking soda to a tub filled with lukewarm (94° to 98°F) water and soak for 30 minutes to an hour, using a cup to pour the water over any part of the body that isn't submerged in the bath. Pat dry. Cool down- Take a cool bath with 1 cup of black tea and 1 cup of apple cider vinegar to the bath water. The black tea helps to reduce the swelling and the apple cider vinegar helps to soothe the pain.

Whatever natural method you decide to go with to treat your next sunburn, be sure to treat the burn right away. Prolonging the treatment of the burn will only prolong the agony of the pain, so take care of your burn on day one.

 

Health and Acupuncture

acupuncture image If you haven't tried it yourself, you've probably met somebody who has or have seen pictures. What seems like a million tiny needles protruding from strategic locations on a patient, lying prostrate and relaxed on a table despite what looks to be a fairly uncomfortable procedure. It may look a bit intimidating but acupuncture is one of the oldest healing practices in the world. Over the past two decades the correlation between health and acupuncture has been studied and practiced in the Western world and has grown increasingly popular, especially in the United States.

The practice which originated in China thousands of years ago, involves the insertion of extremely thin needles through the skin, to various depths at strategic points on your body. And although Western scientists may not fully understand how or why this holistic method of healing works, studies indicate that it may provide a number of medical benefits including pain reduction and relief from chemotherapy-induced nausea.

How acupuncture works According to the National Center for Complementary and Alternative Medicine, acupuncture is based on the concept that disease results from disruption in the flow of the life force called chi and an imbalance in the forces of yin and yang. Health results from a harmonious balance between yin and yang. Chi is believed to flow through pathways (meridians) in your body. These meridians and the energy flow are accessible through more than 350 acupuncture points. Illness results from an imbalance of the forces. Inserting needles into these points in various combinations will re-balance energy flow.

The Mayo clinic website asserts that Western medicine has its own explanation, stating that acupuncture incorporates modern concepts of neuroscience. Many practitioners view the acupuncture points as places to stimulate nerves, muscles and connective tissue. This stimulation appears to boost the activity of your body's natural painkillers and increase blood flow.

What exactly happens during an acupuncture session? Acupuncture usually involves a series of weekly or biweekly treatments in an outpatient setting. Each visit typically includes an exam with an assessment of current condition, the needle insertion and a follow-up discussion on self-care tips.

You'll lie down on a comfortable surface. Depending on where the needles are to go, you will lie face down, face up or on your side before the needles are inserted. The needles used in acupuncture are metallic, solid, and hair-thin. As with anything, different people experience acupuncture differently. But most patients feel no or minimal pain as the needles are inserted. Some people feel energized by treatment, while others feel relaxed. Improper needle placement, movement of the patient during the procedure, or a defect in the needle can cause soreness and pain during treatment. It is vitally important to seek treatment from a qualified acupuncture practitioner.

As many as a dozen needles may need to be placed for each treatment. Once the needles are inserted, they're usually left in place for five to 20 minutes. After placement, the needles are sometimes moved gently or stimulated with electricity or heat.

Who can benefit from acupuncture? Acupuncture is useful as a stand-alone treatment for many conditions, but it's also used in conjunction with more conventional Western medical treatments. For example, doctors may combine acupuncture and drugs to control pain and nausea after surgery.

Preliminary studies indicate that acupuncture may offer symptomatic relief for a variety of diseases and conditions including low back pain, headaches, fibromyalgia, migraines and osteoarthritis. In addition, research has shown that acupuncture can help manage postoperative dental pain and alleviate chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting. It has also been shown to offer relief for chronic menstrual cramps and tennis elbow.

According to the NCCAM website, a 2007 National Health Interview Survey estimated 3.1 million U.S. adults and 150,000 children had used acupuncture in the previous year. Between the 2002 and 2007 survey, acupuncture use among adults increased by three-tenths of 1 percent which is approximately 1 million people.

Pros and Cons As with any medical therapy, acupuncture has benefits and risks. Here are a few benefits:

Acupuncture is safe when performed properly. It has few side effects. It can be useful as a complement to other treatment methods. It's becoming more available in conventional medical settings. It helps control certain types of pain. It may be an alternative if you don't respond to or don't want to take pain medications.

Acupuncture may not be safe if you have a bleeding disorder or if you're taking blood thinners. The most common side effects of acupuncture are soreness, bleeding or bruising at the needle sites. If needles are reused, infectious diseases may be accidentally transmitted. However, these risks can be avoided in the hands of a competent, certified acupuncture practitioner. So it's important to do your homework when locating a practitioner.

Whether you're in tune with your body's chi and/or median zones, the correlation between health and acupuncture is interesting and impressive. Check it out if you're inclined. With a rich history rooted in thousands of years of practice, acupuncture is no longer for only the adventurous or ultra-health conscious.

Natural Remedy Healing and the Inside Scoop on Chiropractic Care

Sometimes going to the doctor just doesn't cut it. Sure if you have the flu or a toenail infection it's important to get the proper vaccine or topical solution needed to get you back on your feet. But what exactly do you do when it comes to aches and pains, muscular fatigue, reproductive system problems or even addictions? Research suggests you may want to visit a chiropractor. chiro image What is Chiropractic? Chiropractic is an alternative approach to health care which concentrates on the relationship between the body's structure and it's functioning, primarily focusing on the spine. Chiropractic medicine is concerned with the relationship between the spinal column, neurons, and the entire nervous system. It is the belief of chiropractic practitioners that the misalignment of the spinal cord or disturbances to the nervous system affects other parts of the body which can create pain, disease, and other musculoskeletal abnormalities. Chiropractors perform adjustments to the spine or other parts of the body with the goal of correcting alignment problems and supporting the body's natural ability to heal itself.

The human body is an astonishing and complex machine. Chiropractic care recognizes this and rather than just feeding the body artificial remedies it relies on your body's innate ability to heal itself from physical, mental, and emotional stress and trauma. Chiropractic is a natural remedy healing art that focuses on human health and prevention of disease through spinal biomechanics as well as musculoskeletal, neurological, vascular and nutritional wellness.

Who uses Chiropractic and for what ailments? It is believed that nearly 15 million Americans look to chiropractic medicine ever year to heal physical injuries like lower back pain, neck pain, and certain internal disorders. Chiropractic also is affiliated with orthopedic medicine and osteopathy and is an excellent alternative for those who want to avoid surgery for injuries such as loose discs in the neck, slight scoliosis, and out of place vertebrae. In addition, chiropractic medicine has become associated with many addiction centers because of the positive effects it can have on patients suffering from the withdrawal symptoms of addiction. Chiropractic medicine benefits children, adolescents, adults, and the elderly.

Chiropractic has become the second largest primary health care field in the world and is more widely accepted than any other natural remedy healing. Hospitals have chiropractors on staff regularly and there are a large number of medical doctors who practice chiropractic medicine as well. This development is huge for the chiropractic field as it serves to lessen the tension between western and eastern medicine. Insurance companies and health maintenance organizations are also recognizing patients of chiropractic for financial health benefits.

Stats Here are a few interesting stats on the chiropractic industry provided by the National Center of Complementary and Alternative Medicine:

  • Nearly 30 percent of the U.S. population, aged 18 and older, have used chiropractic, according to The Gallup Organization. 1991.
  • Nine of ten chiropractic users felt their treatment was effective, according to The Gallup Organization, 1991.
  • In a two-year study completed in 1990 Britain's Medical Research Council, chiropractic treatment was found more effective than hospital outpatient care for low back pain.
  • According to records from the 1986 Worker's Compensation Fund, the average medical patient was paid ten times more compensation than the average chiropractic patient for the treatment of low back pain.