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Everyone has heard that an apple a day can keep the doctor away, but if you are a woman over the age of 50 then you should be having a banana or two along with that apple. 

Recent studies show that woman over the age of 50 who ate foods high in potassium were 12 percent less likely to suffer from a stroke in general and 16 percent less likely to suffer from a stroke caused by a blood clot, or an ischemic stroke. 

Lastly the study showed that women were 10 percent less likely to die, from any cause, than those who ate low amounts of food containing potassium.

Another interesting finding from the study was that the correlation between potassium intake and stroke prevention was highest amongst women who did not have high blood pressure.  Therefore, nutritionists suggest that women should increase their potassium intake before high blood pressure has the chance to develop.

For women who aren’t big fans of bananas, never fear.  You can get twice as much potassium in a serving of spinach than you get in one banana. Become a label reader as many foods contain potassium that you may not know about.

It’s time to get fit for Fall, with this 30-day Cardio Challenge featuring 2 exercises – high knees and mountain climbers.

Day 1:  40 high knees, 20 climbers

Day 2:  60 high knees, 40 climbers

Day 3:  20 high knees, 60 climbers

Day 4:  40 high knees, 20 climbers

Day 5: 60 high knees, 40 climbers

Day 6: 60 high knees, 20 climbers

Day 7:  80 high knees, 40 climbers

Day 8: 40 high knees, 20 climbers

Day 9: 80 high knees, 40 climbers

Day 10: 80 high knees, 60 climbers

Day 11: 100 high knees, 20 climbers

Day 12: 80 high knees, 40 climbers

Day 13: 40 high knees, 40 climbers

Day 14: 80 high knees, 60 climbers

Day 15: 100 high knees, 60 climbers

Day 16: 140 high knees, 40 climbers

Day 17: 100 high knees, 40 climbers

Day 18: 40 high knees, 80 climbers

Day 19: 100 high knees, 40 climbers

Day 20: 140 high knees, 60 climbers

Day 21:  160 high knees, 40 climbers

Day 22: 120 high knees, 60 climbers

Day 23 :60 high knees, 20 climbers

Day 24: 100 high knees, 40 climbers

Day 25: 160 high knees, 20 climbers

Day 26: 200 high knees, 20 climbers

Day 27: 160 high knees, 40 climbers

Day 28: 100 high knees, 20 climbers

Day 29: 100 high knees, 80 climbers

Day 30: 240 high knees, 60 climbers

  • Sweet potatoes are an excellent source of vitamin A in the form of beta carotene and vitamin C.
  • The nutrients in sweet potatoes are also anti-inflammatory, which means that besides being great tasting, sweet potatoes can help reduce the severity of conditions like asthma, osteoarthritis, and rheumatoid arthritis.
  • In addition, sweet potatoes are a good source of vitamin B6.

Recipe: Golden Sweet Potato Brownies 

  • 1 cup butter
  • 1 cup packed brown sugar
  • 1 cup white sugar
  • 4 eggs
  • 2 teaspoons vanilla extract
  • 1 ½ cups all-purpose flour
  • 1 teaspoon baking powder
  • ½ teaspoon salt
  • 2 cups peeled and finely shredded sweet potatoes
  • 1 cup powdered sugar
  • 2 tablespoons butter or margarine
  • 2 tablespoons milk

Preheat the oven to 350. Grease a 9x13 inch baking dish. In a large bowl, cream together the butter, brown sugar, and white sugar until smooth. Beat in the eggs one at a time, then stir in the vanilla. Combine the flour, baking powder, and salt; stir into the batter just until blended. Fold in the shredded yam. Spread the batter evenly in the greased baking dish. Bake for 30 minutes. Mix the confectioners' sugar, butter and milk until smooth. Spread over the brownies while they are still warm

Recipe: Spicy Baked Sweet Potato Fries 

  • 6 sweet potatoes cut into French fries
  • 2 tablespoons canola oil
  • 3 tablespoons taco seasoning mix
  • ¼ teaspoon cayenne pepper 
  • Preheat the oven to 425 degrees.

In a plastic bag, combine the sweet potatoes, canola oil, taco seasoning, and cayenne pepper. Close and shake the bag until the fries are evenly coated. Spread the fries out in a single layer on two large baking sheets.

Bake for 30 minutes, or until crispy and brown on one side. Turn the fries overusing a spatula, and cook for another 30 minutes, or until they are all crispy on the outside and tender inside. Thinner fries may not take as long. 

Now that school is back in session and children are more susceptible to COVID, colds and the flu, many parents wonder whether it is safe to send their child to school or not.  While many schools have specific guidelines regarding sick children, the following points are a general rule of thumb that will help you determine whether it is safe or not for your child and others. 

 

Your child will need to stay home if:

  • They have a fever higher than 100.4 degrees Fahrenheit.
  • They are vomiting.
  • They have diarrhea.
  • They are in the first 24 hours of pink eye or strep throat antibiotics.

Generally, children can return to school when they have no fever, they can eat and drink normally, they are well rested and alert enough to pay attention in class and once they have completed any doctor-recommended isolation due to pink eye or strep throat.

(Continued from Part I…)

 

  • Hepatitis B - Hepatitis B is spread through blood or other bodily fluids. It’s especially dangerous for babies, since the hepatitis B virus can spread from an infected mother to child during birth. About nine out of every 10 infants who contract it from their mothers become chronically infected, which is why babies should get the first dose of the hepatitis B vaccine shortly after birth.
  • Hepatitis A - The Hepatitis A vaccine was developed in 1995 and since then has cut the number of cases dramatically in the United States. Hepatitis A is a contagious liver disease and is transmitted through person-to-person contact or through contaminated food and water. Vaccinating against hepatitis A is a good way to help your baby stay healthy and hepatitis-free.
  • Rubella - Rubella is spread by coughing and sneezing. It is especially dangerous for a pregnant woman and her developing baby. If an unvaccinated pregnant woman gets infected with rubella, she can have a miscarriage, or her baby could die just after birth.
  • While these are just a few, it’s important to keep your regular yearly appointments to ensure that you and your family are up-to-date on all of your vaccinations.
  • Hib - Hib (or its official name, Haemophilus influenzaetype b) isn’t as well-known as some of the other diseases, thanks to vaccines. Hib can do some serious damage to a child’s immune systems and cause brain damage, hearing loss, or even death. Hib mostly affects kids under five years old.
  • Measles - Measles is very contagious, and it can be serious, especially for young children. Because measles is common in other parts of the world, unvaccinated people can get measles while traveling and bring it into the United States. Anyone who is not protected against measles is at risk, so make sure to stay up to date on your child’s vaccines.