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  • Plums, and their dried version known as prunes, are very high in phytonutrients, which function as an antioxidant and provide much benefit to the body.
  • Eating plums helps in the production and absorption of iron in the body, thereby leading to better blood circulation leading further to the growth of healthy tissues.
  • Consuming plums on a regular basis will help prevent macular degeneration and other eye infections.

Recipe: Chicken Breasts with Plum Salsa and Basmati Rice

1 ½ cups of water

1 cup uncooked basmati rice, rinsed and drained

¾ pound plums, pitted and chopped

½ medium red onion, minced

3 habanero peppers, seeded and minced

3 tablespoons fresh minced cilantro

1 teaspoon sugar

¾ pound boneless, skinless chicken breasts

2 teaspoons fresh rosemary, minced

Salt and pepper to taste

2 teaspoons vegetable oil 

Place water in medium saucepan and stir in rice. Bring to boil.  Cover, reduce heat and simmer for 20 minutes. Remove from heat, cool and fluff with fork.  In a bowl, mix the plums, peppers, onions, cilantro and sugar. Cover and refrigerate for 30 minutes. Season chicken with rosemary, salt and pepper.  Heat vegetable oil in skillet over medium-heat. Place chicken in oil and brown 1 minute per side.  Reduce heat to medium, and cook for 5 additional minutes per side.  Serve over rice with plum salsa.

Recipe: Fresh Summer Fruit Salad

½ cup water

2/3 cup sugar

3 cups thinly sliced rhubarb

15 seedless grapes, halved

½ orange, sectioned

10 fresh strawberries, hulled and halved

1 apple, cored and diced

1 peach, sliced

1 plum, pitted and sliced

15 pitted Bing cherries

¼ cup fresh blueberries 

Bring water and sugar to boil in a medium saucepan over medium heat.  Stir in the rhubarb, turn heat to low, cover and simmer until rhubarb is soft, 10 to 15 minutes.  Mash and chill in the refrigerator about one hour.   To serve, mix the grapes, orange, strawberries, apple, peach, plum, cherries, and blueberries with 2/3 cup of the rhubarb sauce.  Stir gently, but thoroughly to coat.  Refrigerate for at least two hours for all of the flavors to blend well.

The calendar might read May, but summertime is just around the corner. It’s time to get geared up for warmer months, longer days and all the fun that only summer can bring. To make this summer your best one yet, here are some health tips to keep in mind these next few months.

 

  • Get at least 150 minutes of aerobic activity a week.
  • Wear sunscreen and insect repellant.
  • Keep cool in extreme heat.
  • Eat a healthy diet including nutritious fruits and vegetables.
  • Keep hydrated with water instead of sugary drinks and alcohol.

 

(Continued from part I)

Common Flu symptoms

  • Fever
  • Cough
  • Sore throat
  • Runny or stuffy nose
  • Body aches
  • Headaches 

Experts say that the biggest mistake that we can do is to self-diagnose. While we are still in this pandemic, you should assume that you have COVID-19 unless you test otherwise. Once you are tested for COVID-19 and depending on those results, you may then want to be tested for the flu (or even strep throat). 

Unfortunately, you can also have more than one illness at a time – like “flurona” or you can experience regular seasonal allergies alongside of having COVID-19 or one of its variants.

There are a few home remedies that can help you once you know for sure what condition is affecting you. For fever and body aches, use fever and pain-reducing medications like acetaminophen and ibuprofen.

For congestion, use an over-the-counter medication like Mucinex. If the congestion is due to allergies, try a nasal steroid spray.

For fatigue, make sure to stay hydrated, get enough electrolytes and lots of rest. Sleep is always your biggest aid to help your body recuperate and regenerate itself.

Another thing to keep in mind is that it is never too late to get vaccinated for COVID-19, the flu or both. Getting vaccinated early helps to build up your immunity and protect you throughout the cold and flu season.

It’s that time of year again and no we aren’t talking about when our furry friend brings us baskets of chocolates and goodies. We are talking about the “perfect storm” of maladies where many play the guessing game of, “What Am I Suffering From?” From new variants of COVID-19 to the common cold, to seasonal allergies and the flu, how are we supposed to figure out how to remedy what ails us, when we don’t even know what it is?

Here are some common symptoms and treatments so we can end the guessing game once and for all.

General COVID-19 symptoms

  • Headache
  • Sore throat
  • Runny nose
  • Fever
  • Loss of Taste and Smell
  • Body aches

Omicron COVID-19 symptoms

  • Cough
  • Fatigue
  • Runny nose and congestion
  • Night sweats
  • Less likely to have a loss of taste or smell 

Common cold symptoms

  • Runny or stuffy nose
  • Sore throat
  • Cough
  • Congestion 

Common Seasonal Allergies symptoms

  • Itchy or watery eyes
  • Itchy throat
  • Itchy ear canals
  • Stuffy or runny nose
  • Tiredness or fatigue

(Continued in part II…)

During this month, millions of people all over the world take part in and recognize April as Parkinson’s Disease Awareness Month.

 

It is a very common disease, but many people are unclear about what Parkinson’s is and how it affects those with the condition. 

According to American Parkinson’s Disease Association (APDA), “Parkinson’s disease (PD) is a type of movement disorder that can affect the ability to perform common, daily activities. It is a chronic and progressive disease, meaning that the symptoms become worse over time. It is characterized by its most common of motor symptoms—tremors (a form of rhythmic shaking), stiffness or rigidity of the muscles, and slowness of movement (called bradykinesia)—but also manifests in non-motor symptoms including sleep problemsconstipation, anxiety, depression, and fatigue, among others.”

Some interesting statistics about Parkinson’s include:

  • Nearly one million Americans are living with Parkinson’s.
    • Approximately 60,000 Americans are diagnosed with Parkinson’s disease each year, and this number does not reflect the thousands of cases that go undetected.
    • Seven to 10 million people worldwide are estimated to be living with Parkinson’s disease.
    • Incidence of Parkinson’s increases with age, but an estimated four percent of people with Parkinson’s are diagnosed before the age of 50.

Unfortunately, the cause of Parkinson’s is unknown and presently, there is no cure. Current research is showing that exercise can improve brain function and may slow disease progression, especially if early onset. The earlier the intervention, the better effects exercise can have on the individual.