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November brings Thanksgiving and all of that delicious food can mean extra pounds this month. Combat those extra calories by joining in on this “Thanks and Planks” Fitness Challenge, which takes just mere seconds each day.

 

Happy Planksgiving! 

Day 1: 20 seconds

Day 2: 30 seconds

Day 3: 30 seconds

Day 4: 35 seconds

Day 5: REST DAY

Day 6: 40 seconds

Day 7: 45 seconds

Day 8: 45 seconds

Day 9: 50 seconds

Day 10: REST DAY

Day 11: 1 minute

Day 12: 1 minute

Day 13: 1 minute, 10 seconds

Day 14: 1 minute, 20 seconds

Day 15: REST DAY

Day 16: 1 minute, 20 seconds

Day 17: 1 minute, 30 seconds

Day 18: 1 minute, 30 seconds

Day 19: 1 minute, 45 seconds

Day 20: REST DAY

Day 21: 1 minute, 45 seconds

Day 22: 1 minute, 45 seconds

Day 23: 2 minutes

Day 24: 2 minutes

Day 25: REST DAY

Day 26: 2 minutes, 15 seconds

Day 27: 2 minutes, 15 seconds

Day 28: 2 minutes, 30 seconds

Day 29: 2 minutes, 45 seconds

Day 30: 3 minutes

So, you have been working out and eating right, but you still can’t get that scale to move in the right direction?  Well, there may be a “strange” reason why you are gaining weight instead of losing weight.

Here are three strange factors that could cause you to be gaining weight, even though you are doing everything you can to lose weight:

  • You take antidepressants.
  • You have digestive issues.
  • Your body is low on Vitamin D, magnesium or iron.

It's that time again for Thanksgiving and while Americans eat it nearly every year to celebrate Thanksgiving, how much do you know about turkey?

  • Turkey is very low in fat and high in protein. It is also a good source of iron, zinc, phosphorus, potassium and B vitamins.
  • The fat and calorie amounts vary because white meat has fewer calories and less fat than dark meat and skin.
  • Turkey is also naturally low in sodium. It typically contains less than 25 milligrams (mg) of sodium per ounce on average.

Recipe: Turkey Chili

  • 2 cups chopped onion
  • 4 garlic cloves, chopped fine
  • 1 cup chopped green pepper
  • ¼ cup olive oil
  • 2 (35 oz.) cans stewed tomatoes, crushed
  • 2 (15 oz.) cans kidney beans, drained
  • 2 tablespoons tomato paste
  • ¾ cup chicken or turkey stock
  • 2 tablespoons chili powder
  • 1 tablespoon ground cumin
  • 1 tablespoon dried hot red pepper flakes
  • 1 teaspoon dried oregano
  • 1 tablespoon salt, plus more if desired to taste
  • ½ teaspoon black pepper
  • 3 to 4 cups shredded, cooked turkey meat
  • Sugar
  • Shredded cheddar cheese, chopped red onion, sour cream for optional garnishes

In a large, 8-quart thick bottom pot, cook the onion and green pepper over medium heat, stirring until golden, about 5 minutes.  Add the garlic, chili powder, cumin, and red pepper flakes, and cook, stirring, for a minute or two more.  Add a bit more olive oil if needed.  Add tomatoes, tomato paste, stock, beans, oregano, salt, pepper and cooked turkey meat.  Bring mixture to a simmer and reduce heat to low.  Simmer uncovered for an hour.

Recipe: Creamed Turkey

  • 3 tablespoons butter
  • ¾ cup sliced mushrooms
  • 3 tablespoons flour
  • 1 ½ cups milk
  • ½ cup hot chicken broth
  • 1 small jar diced pimento, drained
  • 4 cups diced cooked turkey
  • Salt and pepper, to taste

Melt butter over medium-low heat. Sauté mushrooms until golden and tender. Add flour; stir until smooth. Slowly pour on milk and broth, stirring constantly, until thickened and bubbly. Add pimiento, turkey, salt and pepper. Cook until heated through, but do not boil. Serve with rice or toast.

Continued from Part I…

 

You’re a calorie counter.

Researchers in St. Louis reported that men and women who limited their daily calories to 1,400 to 2,000 (about 25% fewer calories than those who followed a typical 2,000-to 3,000-calorie Western diet) were literally young at heart—their hearts functioned like those of people 15 years younger. 

You prefer to drink tea.

Both green and black teas contain a concentrated dose of catechins, substances that help blood vessels relax and protect your heart. 

You skip cola (regular and diet).

Scientists in Boston found that drinking one or more regular or diet colas every day doubles your risk of metabolic syndrome—a cluster of conditions, including high blood pressure, elevated insulin levels, and excess fat around the waist, that increase your chance of heart disease and diabetes.

You eat purple food.

Concord grapes, blueberries, red wine: They all get that deep, rich color from polyphenols—compounds that reduce heart disease risk and may also protect against Alzheimer's disease, according to research. 

You’re not a burger-eater.

A few palm-size servings (about 2½ ounces) of beef, pork, or lamb now and then is no big deal, but eating more than 18 ounces of red meat per week ups your risk of colorectal cancer—the third most common type, according to a major report by the American Institute for Cancer Research. 

You run at least 40 minutes a day.

Scientists in California found that middle-aged people who did just that—for a total of about 5 hours per week—lived longer and functioned better physically and cognitively as they got older.

Thanks to advances in health, education and disease prevention, people are living longer – many people hitting triple digits – more so than ever before. 

But there are also some everyday habits, or circumstances in your past, that can influence how long and how well you’ll live. 

Here is a two-part article of some science-based signs that you are on the long-life path. 

You love to work out.

Studies have shown that staying physically active can help improve your longevity and help reduce your risk for heart disease, diabetes, and other health conditions.

You have a relatively flat stomach after menopause.

Women who are too round in the middle are 20% more likely to die sooner (even if their body mass index is normal), according to a National Institute on Aging study. At midlife, it takes more effort to keep waists trim because shifting hormones cause most extra weight to settle in the middle. 

You were a healthy-weight teen.

A study in the Journal of Pediatrics that followed 137 African Americans from birth to age 28 found that being overweight at age 14 increases your risk of developing type 2 diabetes in adulthood. 

You like raspberries in your oatmeal.

Dietary fiber helps reduce total and LDL ("bad") cholesterol, improve insulin sensitivity, and boost weight loss. 

Continued in Part II…