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  • Many people do not know that pumpkins are made up of 90 percent water.
  • Pumpkins also contain other great nutritional aspects including potassium and vitamin A.
  • The bright orange color of pumpkins also tells us that they are a great source of the important antioxidant, beta carotene.

Recipe: Traditional Pumpkin Pie 

1 ¾ cups (one 15oz. can) unsweetened pumpkin puree

¾ cup light brown sugar, packed

2 teaspoons ground ginger

1 ½ teaspoons ground cinnamon

½ teaspoon salt

2/3 cup milk

2/3 cup heavy cream

3 large eggs

1 teaspoon vanilla extract 

(For crust us a pre-made store bought crust or a homemade crust) In a small heavy saucepan, stir the pumpkin, brown sugar, spices and salt together until mixed.  Bring the mixture to a simmer, stirring constantly.  Reduce the heat to low and cook, stirring constantly, for 3 to 5 minutes or until thick and shiny.  Scrape the mixture into a mixer or food processor for 1 minute. With the motor on, add the milk and cream, mixing until incorporated completely.  Add the eggs one at a time, mixing just to incorporate, about 5 seconds after each egg.  When you add the last egg, also add the vanilla. Pour the mixture into the prepared pie shell.  Bake the pie for 50 - 60 minutes at 375 degrees. 

Recipe: Pumpkin Soup 

6 cups chicken stock

1 ½ teaspoons salt

4 cups pumpkin puree

1 teaspoon chopped fresh parsley

1 cup chopped onion

½ teaspoon chopped fresh thyme

1 clove garlic minced

½ cup heavy whipping cream

5 whole black peppercorns 

Heat stock, salt, pumpkin, onion, thyme, garlic, and peppercorns.  Bring to a boil; reduce heat to low, simmer for 30 minutes uncovered.  Puree the soup in small batches (1 cup at a time) using a food processor or blender.  Return to pan and bring to boil again.  Reduce heat to low, and simmer for another 30 minutes, uncovered.  Stir in heavy cream.  Pour into soup bowls and garnish with fresh parsley.

When most people begin their weight loss journey, they want to start with that stubborn belly fat. So, crunches – and lots of them – is the workout routine for you, right? Wrong! In fact, spot reduction in exercise simply doesn’t exist. Instead, trainers suggest these core-focused exercises that will help combat fat throughout your body resulting in less belly fat.

Burpees – this exercise works your core, chest, shoulders, lats, triceps, and quads. Great all-around exercise.

Mountain climbers – like burpees, this moving plank exercise works out a ton of different muscles.

Turkish Get-up – this 200-year-old exercise involves a kettle ball and is great for burning belly fat and conditioning your whole body.

(Continued from part I…)

 

According to experts, the greatest risk factor for Alzheimer’s disease and other dementias is increasing age. Although age increases risk, dementia is not a normal part of aging. 

There are more than 20 genes which affect a person’s risk of developing dementia. The gene APOE was the first known to increases a person’s risk of developing Alzheimer’s disease, and it is still the strongest risk gene known. There are also genes which directly cause dementia, but these deterministic genes are rare – they are estimated to account for less than 1% of dementia cases and cause young-onset forms in which symptoms usually develop before the age of 60. 

Keeping active, eating well, and engaging in social activities all promote good brain health and may reduce your risk of developing dementia. Keeping your heart healthy, including by avoiding smoking and excessive alcohol consumption, can lower your risk of dementia and other diseases too.

While there is no cure for Alzheimer’s disease or for most other causes of dementia at present, the problems associated with dementia such as restlessness and depression can be treated. It may also be possible, especially in the early stages of dementia, to improve someone’s memory with medication.

It is also possible to help people with dementia in a variety of practical ways. These include ways of caring for people with dementia which build on the strengths and abilities of those affected. This ensures that people with dementia maintain a sense of well-being and individuality throughout their illness.

Although there is no known cure, there is always hope for a breakthrough. That's why it's so important to stay informed. World Alzheimer's Month is one big way to keep the conversation going.

Every September, Alzheimer’s Awareness is celebrated worldwide, and World Alzheimer’s Day takes place every year on September 21.

Understanding Alzheimer’s is important because Alzheimer’s disease is the “most common form of dementia, affecting about 6 percent of people 65 and older.”

In this two-part article, we will talk about this disease in depth and give you some ways to get involved in this important awareness event.

First some facts and figures associated with Alzheimer’s Disease. Dementia is an umbrella term for a collection of symptoms that are caused by disorders affecting the brain and impacting memory, thinking, behavior and emotion, like Alzheimer’s. Symptoms include loss of memory, difficulty in finding the right words or understanding what people are saying, difficulty in performing previously routine tasks, and personality and mood changes.

Important facts about Alzheimer’s are:

  1. It's a killer

About one in three seniors dies with Alzheimer's or another type of dementia — more than breast cancer and prostate cancer combined.​

  1. ​Deaths are increasing

​Since 2000, deaths from Alzheimer's disease have increased by more than 120 percent.

  1. Alzheimer's will affect more and more Americans

​If current projections are accurate, by the year 2050, the number of Americans suffering from Alzheimer's disease will reach nearly 14 million.

  1. ​Women are most likely to be affected

​Statistics show that about two-thirds of Americans with Alzheimer's disease are women.

  1. ​Hispanics are more susceptible

Statistics also show that ​Hispanics are about one-and-a-half times as likely to have Alzheimer's disease (or other dementias) as older, white, non-Hispanics.

 

(Continued in part II…)

It’s the start of a new month and that means a new monthly challenge. Because we love alliteration, how about the Squat’n September Challenge? 

This 30-day challenge will have you squatting your way through the month of September.

Day 1: 50 squats

Day 2: 55 squats

Day 3: 60 squats

Day 4: REST

Day 5: 70 squats

Day 6: 75 squats

Day 7: 80 squats

Day 8: REST

Day 9: 100 squats

Day 10: 105 squats

Day 11: 110 squats

Day 12: REST

Day 13: 130 squats

Day 14: 135 squats

Day 15: 140 squats

Day 16: REST

Day 17: 150 squats

Day 18: 155 squats

Day 19: 160 squats

Day 20: REST

Day 21: 180 squats

Day 22: 185 squats

Day 23: 190 squats

Day 24: REST

Day 25: 220 squats

Day 26: 225 squats

Day 27: 230 squats

Day 28: REST

Day 29: 240 squats

Day 30: 250 squats